Getting Crafty: Easy-to-Make Pin Cushion

Deanna shares with us how to make this cute pin cushion (as shown at in her article, Decorating With Vintage Planters, at Collector’s Quest):

First of all, no vintage pottery was harmed in the making of this guy! So collectors, relax.

Second of all, a child can do this — no, seriously.

This project was born because I was, like most who repair vintage slips, in need of a place to go to for quick repair jobs. And I wanted it to be cute. ;)

Since I am a collector, I had this stuff laying around, and I thought, hey, this might just work…

What you’ll need:

1) A old planter made of pottery (those used for cactus or small violets etc are perfect because the hole to plant in is small)

2) cotton balls

3) Aida cloth (can be found at most craft/sewing stories; CreateForLess has Aida cloth in many colors to co-ordinate with your planter!)

Step One:

Make sure the planter is clean (and dry).

Step Two:

Take a number of cotton balls and stuff them into the area, similar to how and where you’d place the dirt when planting. Since they are light and fluffy, a few will do the job quickly. (Do not pack them tight, just plop them in there!)

Step Three:

The Aida cloth I had was one of those small oval pieces (found in a box of craft and sewing supplies at a rummage sale), so it was rather small to begin with. If you have a larger piece of cloth, just cut a piece large enough to cover the opening of the planter, but small enough to easily tuck inside. I’d say you need no more than an inch wider (on each side) than the area you are covering.

Step Four:

Place the Aida cloth over the opening with cotton balls sticking out and tuck the edges inside.

Step Five:

Stick in pins.

Yup, it’s that easy. The Aida cloth is tight enough to hold the pins in place, the cotton balls give the pins and needles something to stick into to stay up-right, and the planter makes the whole thing cute enough to keep out on your dresser. (And since it’s larger and showier than those cloth balls to hold pins, it will not be buried in cluttered homes — :ahem: not that I would know about that…)

Since nothing is sewn, glued or otherwise made permanent, the vintage planter is not harmed in anyway. Should you be a more active sewer (or voracious pin placer), the Aida cloth can be replaced at any time. In fact, you can change pottery pieces, Aida cloth etc, at your whim!

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